Using Dictation to Elicit Students’ Writing and Grammar Skills


(Posting on using dictation to elicit students’ writing and grammar skills; by one NEB)

Dictation still has its significance if done properly with a goal in mind. Dictation can be used to elicit students’ writing and grammar skills. Items for this purpose should be prepared well ahead. Items for this should be at the sentence level. Students are assessed with regards to their knowledge and skills in contracted forms, sounds, sound linking, and writing mechanics. For example, dictate the following:

1.   He’s booked. Therefore, we cannot recruit him (to elicit students’ knowledge of contracted sounds and the use of full stops, capital letters, and commas).

2.   He’s booked; therefore, we cannot recruit him (to elicit students’ knowledge of contracted sounds and the use of semi-colons, small letters, commas, and full stops).

3.   We need these items: a book, a pen, and a pencil (to elicit students’ knowledge of the use of colons, commas, and full stops).

4.   He was there. He said nothing (to elicit students’ knowledge of the use of full stops and capital letters).

5.   He was there; he said nothing (to elicit students’ knowledge of the use of semi-colons, small letters, and full stops).

6.   She was sick, so she didn’t go (to elicit students’ knowledge of the use of commas with conjunctions, and full stops).

7.   She was sick; so she didn’t go (to elicit students’ knowledge of the use of semi-colons, small letters, and full stops).

8.   The woman talked, the man listening (to elicit students’ knowledge of the use of commas with reduced clauses).

9.   The woman talked. The man listened (the same as No.4).

10. The woman talked; the man listened (the same as No. 5).

11. The woman, known for her generosity, is American (the same as No. 8).

12. He is short-haired, small-eyed, and big-chested (to elicit students’ knowledge of the use of hyphens in compound adjectives, commas, and full stops).

13. It is a buy-now-pay-later purchasing mode (to elicit students’ knowledge of the use of hyphens in compound forms and full stops).

14. etc.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.